Discuss four stages of group formation

Discuss four stages of group formation
walden nurs6530 week 5-11 discussions

Week 5 discussion

To prepare:

• Review the information in this week’s Learning Resources regarding the stages of group formation, problematic roles individuals play in groups, and strategies for facilitating and maintaining positive group collaboration. In particular, review Learning Exercise 19.12 on page 464 of the course text.

• Reflect on various groups with which you have been or are currently involved. Select one specific group to analyze for the purposes of this Discussion. Identify the purpose or task that the group is or was meant to perform.

• Consider the four stages of group formation (forming, storming, norming, and performing). How would you describe the progression between stages? Is there a stage in which you believe your group is or was “stuck”?

• Consider the task or group-building role you normally play in a group setting. How could you apply the information from the Learning Resources to improve your group participation and facilitation, as well as the functioning of the group as a whole?

• In addition, think about which individuals within your group (including yourself) may fall into problematic roles such as the Dominator, the Aggressor, or the Blocker. How have you and your group members addressed the enactment of these roles and its impact on interactions? With information from the Learning Resources in mind, what strategies would you apply now or going forward?

By Day 3

Post a description of a group with which you have been or are currently involved. Assess where the group is in terms of the four stages of group formation. If you are reflecting on a past experience, explain if your group moved through all four stages. Describe the task or group-building role you typically play, or played, in this group. Then, explain what strategies you, as a leader, can apply to better facilitate the group process and address any problematic individual roles in the group.

Week 6 discussion

Week 6: Power and the Image of Nursing

Bring to mind a nurse whose words, behaviors, or reputation convey power. What is it about this individual that suggests power? How does your perception of this person relate to your view of yourself as a nurse leader and the image you associate with nursing?

This week addresses the concept of power. Through reflection, you examine types and sources of power as well as opportunities for expanding one’s own power base. In addition, you continue to work on your group paper for the Week 7 Assignment.

Learning Objectives

Students will:

• Differentiate types and associated sources of power

• Evaluate strategies for increasing nursing’s power base

Photo Credit: monkeybusinessimages/iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images

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Learning Resources

Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.

Required Readings

Marquis, B. L., & Huston, C. J. (2015). Leadership roles and management functions in nursing: Theory and application (8th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

• Chapter 13, “Organizational, Political, and Personal Power”

Chapter 13 delves into different types of power. As you read, consider how you see power demonstrated within your own organization.

Anderson, C., & Brion, S. (2014). Perspectives on power in organizations. Annual. Rev. Organ. Psychol. Organ. Behavior, 1(1), 67–97. doi:10.1146/annurev-orgpsych-031413-091259. Retrived from http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/pdf/10.1146/annurev-orgpsych-031413-091259

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Leach, L. S., & McFarland, P. (2014). Assessing the professional development needs of experienced nurse executive leaders. Journal of Nursing Administration, 44(1), 51–62. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

McMurry, T. B. (2011). The image of male nurses and nursing leadership mobility. Nursing Forum, 46(1), 22–28. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

This article discusses the underrepresentation of males in nursing and the advantages and difficulties faced by men in the nursing profession.

Rao, A. (2012). The contemporary construction of nurse empowerment. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 44(4), 396–402. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Spence Laschinger, H. K., & Fida, R. (2014). New nurses burnout and workplace wellbeing: The influence of authentic leadership and psychological capital. Burnout Research. 1(1), 19–28.Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2012h). Personal power plan. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 14 minutes.In this week’s media presentation, experts share patient experiences that have enriched their lives personally and professionally along with strategies for increasing personal power.

Discussion: Power Dynamics

There is no graded Discussion Board assignment this week; however, a Week 6 optional discussion board is available for your voluntary participation.

Bring to mind a nurse whose words, behaviors, or reputation convey power.

What is it about this individual that suggests power?

How does your perception of this person relate to your view of yourself as a nurse leader and the image you associate with nursing?

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Week 7 discussion

Post a summary of an incident involving ineffective communication. Describe communication barriers and other challenges that contributed to the incident. Propose one or more strategies that could have been employed to promote a better outcome. Be sure to refer to elements of the communication process.

Week 8 discussion

Week 8: Leadership and Management

Management is efficiency in climbing the ladder of success; leadership determines whether the ladder is leaning against the right wall.—Stephen R. Covey

What does it take to successfully lead and manage in today’s health care settings?

In your practice setting, you have undoubtedly performed many leadership and management activities. However, you may or may not have been provided with the training and preparation needed to be an effective manager and leader. Moreover, being a good manager is not necessarily the same as being a good leader.

Throughout this course, you have been introduced to many concepts related to leadership and management. This week, you examine more closely the distinctions between management and leadership, as well as the characteristics of effective managers and leaders.

Learning Objectives

Students will:

• Analyze how management and leadership roles differ in terms of supporting an organization to set and achieve goals

• Distinguish characteristics of effective managers and leaders

• Differentiate the concepts of leadership and management within the nursing profession/a health care organization

Learning Resources Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.

Required Readings

Marquis, B. L., & Huston, C. J. (2015). Leadership roles and management functions in nursing: Theory and application (8th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

• Review Chapters 2 and 3

Note: Many of the articles in this week’s Required Readings are foundational in the leadership and management literature. The concepts presented in these early articles still apply to today’s workplace.

Brunettoa Y., Shacklockb K., et al. (2012). Comparing the impact of leader–member exchange, psychological empowerment and affective commitment upon Australian public and private sector nurses: implications for retention. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 23(11), 2238-2255.Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Jennings, B. M., Scalzi, C. C., Rodgers, J. D., & Keane, A. (2007). Differentiating nursing leadership and management competencies. Nursing Outlook, 55(4), 169–175.Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

In this foundational article, Jennings explores the similarities and differences between leadership and management competencies. The research implies that there is a growing ambiguity between the competencies required in nursing that must be addressed.

Keys, Y. (2014). Looking ahead to our next generation of nurse leaders: Generation X Nurse Managers. Journal of nursing management, 22(1), 97–105.doiI: 10.1111/jonm.12198. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Leach, L. S., & McFarland, P. (2014). Assessing the Professional Development Needs of Experienced Nurse Executive Leaders. Journal of Nursing Administration, 44(1), 51–62. doi: 10.1097/NNA.0000000000000021. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Marker, D. (2010). Leadership or management? Management Quarterly, 51(2), 31–34.Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

This article defines what leadership and management are and explains differences between the concepts. According to Marker, managers are associated with position and power, while leadership is associated with position, guidance, and communication.

Ross, E. J., Fitzpatrick, J. J., Click, E. R., Krouse, H. J., & Clavelle, J. T. (2014). Transformational leadership practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations. Journal of Nursing Administration, 44(4), 201–206.doi: 10.1097/NNA.0000000000000044

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Stoddart, K., Bugge, C., Shepherd, A., & Farquharson, B. (2014). The new clinical leadership role of senior charge nurses: a mixed methods study of their views and experience. Journal of Nursing Management, 22(1), 49–59.DOI: 10.1111/jonm.12008

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2012f). Integrating leadership and management competencies. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 15 minutes.

Effective nurses need both leadership and management skills. In this week’s media, experts discuss management competencies and leadership competencies (which are distinct) and explain the value of management and leadership skills within the context of effective organizations.

Discussion: The Distinction Between Leadership

and Management

Think of the managers you have reported to thus far in your career. Now consider the people you have worked with or know of that you would consider leaders. Based on these experiences, what would you surmise about the responsibilities of managers and leaders and about the distinctions between these two categories in health care settings?

This week’s Learning Resources classify management and leadership (which are often confused in everyday discussion) and explain their significance for health care organizations. As you advance professionally, it is critical to understand the distinctions between management and leadership and how you can apply this knowledge for increasing effectiveness in your workplace.

To prepare:

• Review the information in the Learning Resources.

• Conduct additional research on your own and select at least two current, credible sources that contribute to your understanding of management and leadership.

• Reflect on how the roles of management and leadership differ in supporting the organization to set and achieve goals.

• Drawing upon specific examples from a current or previous practice setting, bring to mind someone who seemed to be a leader but not a manager and someone who seemed to be a manager but not a leader (generally speaking, or within a specific circumstance). Be prepared to support your assessment with specific behavioral descriptions found in the literature.

By Day 3

Post an analysis of how management and leadership roles differ in terms of supporting an organization to set and achieve goals. In addition, post descriptions of an individual who demonstrates leadership behaviors but not management behaviors and an individual who demonstrates management behaviors but not leadership behaviors. Provide your rationale, identifying specific characteristics of effective managers and leaders. (Note: Do not identify these individuals by name, position, or location.)

Read a selection of your colleagues’ responses.

Week 9 discussion

Week 9: Styles of Leadership

What makes a good leader? This question is likely to elicit a diversity of responses from various individuals. Yet, leadership is frequently regarded as a critical contributor to organizational success—and an individual’s professional success as well.

This week, you examine leadership characteristics and styles and consider how particular contexts shape the need for leadership. As a key component of your coursework this week, you explore your own leadership skills and preferences through the use of assessments and self-reflection.

Learning Objectives

• Differentiate among authoritative, democratic, and laissez-faire leadership styles

• Assess personal leadership characteristics using standardized instruments

• Analyze potential challenges associated with various leadership styles

• Formulate recommendations for personal leadership development

Required Readings

Marquis, B. L., & Huston, C. J. (2015). Leadership roles and management functions in nursing: Theory and application (8th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

• Review Chapters 2 and 3

Azaare, J., & Gross, J. (2011). The nature of leadership style in nursing management. British Journal of Nursing, 20(11), 672–676, 678–680.Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

The authors examine the different styles of leadership that nurse managers use and discusses how staff nurses in their study preferred managers who use a proactive, articulate, and independent leadership style.

Benoliela, P. & Somecha, A. (2014). The health and performance effects of participative leadership: Exploring the moderating role of the Big Five personality dimensions European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 23(2), 277–294. doi:10.1080/1359432X.2012.717689Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Graham, S., & Melnyk, B. M. (2014). The Birth of a Healthcare Leadership Academy: Lessons Learned From The Ohio State University. Nurse Leader, 12(2), 55–74. doi:10.1016/j.mnl.2014.01.001. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Zydziunaite, V, & Suominen, T. Leadership styles of nurse managers in ethical dilemmas: Reasons and consequences. Contemporary Nurse, 48(2), 150–16. doi:10.5172/conu.2014.48.2.150. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Wall Street Journal staff. (n.d.). Leadership Styles. Retrieved from http://guides.wsj.com/management/developing-a-leadership-style/how-to-develop-a-leadership-style/?mod=WSJBlog

This section of the Wall Street Journal website features a variety of articles and video clips on leadership. The Walden Library also has holdings of Wall Street Journal articles.

Keirsey Temperament Sorter (KTS-II). (n.d.). Retrieved July 20, 2012, from http://www.keirsey.com/

Discussion: Leadership Style – Throughout your career, you will work with many people who display differing leadership styles. As a nurse leader, it is imperative that you communicate well and get along with those whose leadership style does not align with your preferences. It is also important to understand your own leadership style, as this can prompt insight into how others relate to you and what skills you may need to develop as your leadership responsibilities grow.

To prepare:Review the information in the Learning Resources, including the leadership styles identified in Chapter 2 of the course text.

• Bring to mind a leader in your organization or one with which you are familiar. Would you describe his or her style as authoritative, democratic, or laissez-faire? Why?

• Which characteristics or approaches demonstrated by this person would you integrate into your own leadership style? Which ones would you prefer not to integrate?

• Think about how this leader’s style and resulting interactions may impact health care quality and patient outcomes.

By Day 3 – Post a description of a leader, distinguishing his or her style as authoritative, democratic, or laissez-faire. Describe the characteristics that inform your perception, and explain which ones you would integrate into your own leadership style, as well as which ones you would prefer not to integrate. Explain at least one potential effect of this leadership style on health care quality and patient outcomes.

Week 10 discussion

Discussion – Week 10

COLLAPSE

Effective Ethical, Moral, and Legal Leadership

Week 11 discussion

Week 11: Conflict Management

What do you think of when you read or hear the word “conflict”??Conflict, in itself, is a neutral phenomenon. Yet, it is typically thought of as a negative occurrence, particularly in organizations that rely on well-coordinated efforts to promote patient safety and other critical outcomes.?This week, you examine conflict as an essential, yet complicated, topic that must be addressed in every health care organization.

As a nurse leader, your preferred conflict-management style—and how you respond to the styles of the people you work with—can have a profound impact on your leadership effectiveness, the resolution of important issues, and patient and staff satisfaction. As such, for this week’s Discussion, you examine conflict management styles and assess strategies for dealing with conflict effectively.

Learning Objectives

• Evaluate conflict management styles

• Evaluate the impact of conflict management styles on leadership effectiveness

• Analyze conflict management strategies

Learning Resources: Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.

Required Readings

Marquis, B. L., & Huston, C. J. (2015). Leadership roles and management functions in nursing: Theory and application (8th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Chapter 21, “Managing Conflict” ?This chapter explores the many facets of conflict, describes what contributes to conflict, and provides strategies for resolving conflict.

CPP. (n.d.). TKI. Retrieved July 24, 2012, from https://www.cpp.com/products/tki/index.aspx

Review the sample report and other items on the Thomas-Kilmann website. You may consider completing this assessment to better understand your conflict management style.

Eagar, S. C., Cowin, L. S., Gregory, L., & Firtko, A. (2010). Scope of practice conflict in nursing: A new war or just the same battle? Contemporary Nurse, 36(1/2), 86–95.Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

This article focuses on creating nursing teams as rapid change occurs within health care. The authors state that for a team to successfully handle conflict, there have to be clear boundaries, minimal confusion, and maximum communication.

Johansen, M. L. (2012). Performance potential. Keeping the peace: Conflict management strategies for nurse managers. Nursing Management, 43(2), 50–54.Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

“Handling conflicts in an efficient and effective manner results in improved quality, patient safety, and staff morale, and limits work stress for the caregiver,” (p. 50). This article presents strategies for managing conflict. Review the methods suggested and consider how you might be able to apply them in the workplace.

Williams, S. (n.d.). Understanding conflict and conflict management. Retrieved from http://www.wright.edu/~scott.williams/LeaderLetter/conflict.htm

This short editorial delineates the major points of conflict resolution.

Discussion: Conflict Management Styles

In Week 10, you considered how ethical, moral, and legal dilemmas can provoke internal conflict when a nurse’s values are not in alignment with the apparent demands of a situation or with others’ values, as well as external conflict that can arise as these dynamics are played out. Of course, conflict can also emerge through seemingly simple issues of little consequence—little consequence, that is, except when they are not properly managed.

Nurse leaders need to be familiar with conflict management styles and the impact these styles can have on interpersonal dynamics, and, ultimately, patient care. For this Discussion, you evaluate a situation marked by conflict and consider how conflict management strategies could be applied to promote positive results.

To prepare:

• Consider a conflict situation you witnessed or were engaged in within your practice setting. Then, proceed as follows:

o Think about who was involved, how it was resolved (if it was), and how it might have been handled more effectively.

o Identify the conflict management style(s) employed by various individuals, including ineffective responses or no response to the situation.

o Evaluate your personal response to this conflict.

• What do your thoughts and actions in this and other conflict situations reveal about your typical approach to conflict?

By Day 3

Post a description of how you handled or avoided a conflict, as well as the results of your approach. Explain how would you respond to this conflict today and/or what steps you would take to improve your comfort level and skill for managing conflict in the future (including specific conflict management strategies you would use). Explain how conflict management relates to your effectiveness as a leader.

Read a selection of your colleagues’ responses.

By Day 6

Respond to at least two of your colleagues on two different days using one or more of the following approaches:

• Ask a probing question, substantiated with additional background information, evidence or research.

• Share an insight from having read your colleagues’ postings, synthesizing the information to provide new perspectives.

• Offer and support an alternative perspective using readings from the classroom or from your own research in the Walden Library.

• Make a suggestion based on additional evidence drawn from readings or after synthesizing multiple postings.

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walden nurs6530 week 5-11 discussions

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