Case Study 9-2: Lifestyle Changes for Weight Loss

Case Study 9-2: Lifestyle Changes for Weight Loss
Study: Lifestyle Changes for Weight Loss

Case Study 9-2: Lifestyle Changes for Weight Loss

Sally is a 43-year-old mother of two who has gained 50 pounds over the past five years. She is 64 inches tall and weighs 180 pounds with a BMI of 30.8. Her waist circumference is 37 inches. She acknowledges that she is not as physically active as she would like to be. She also notes how recent stresses in her life have affected her sleep and seem to have triggered her appetite for sweets. Sally’s father recently died from complications of type 2 diabetes and her mother and sisters are overweight. Sally says she is very motivated to “not get diabetes” and is disturbed that her recent physical exam revealed mildly elevated blood pressure, glucose, and cholesterol levels.

1. How does Sally’s family history influence her weight and risk for diabetes? What lifestyle choices may influence her genetic predisposition to be overweight?

2. Using information in this chapter, what is a reasonable goal weight for Sally? How long would you estimate it would take her to safely lose this amount of weight?

3. What weight-loss strategies may help curb Sally’s stress-related eating?

4. Sally has determined that—to lose weight—she needs to limit her daily caloric intake to 1400 kcalories. Use Table 9-2 and show a one-day plan for meals and snacks that meet her nutritional needs within this calorie level.

5. What are some advantages to Sally keeping a food and exercise record? What other factors besides food intake and physical activity may be useful for Sally to record?

6. Why might strength training be an important addition to Sally’s exercise regimen?

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