Case Study 8, Chapter 48, Disorders of Musculoskeletal Function: Trauma, Infection, Neoplasms

Case Study 8, Chapter 48, Disorders of Musculoskeletal Function: Trauma, Infection, Neoplasms

Norris, T. (2019). Porth’s Pathophysiology: Concepts of Altered Health States. 10th Ed. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

No references needed,

Case Study 8, Chapter 48, Disorders of Musculoskeletal Function: Trauma, Infection, Neoplasms
Marvin is a healthy, active 36-year-old who belongs to a martial arts club. Once a week, he takes lessons in Judo, and on the weekends, he participates in local competitions. At his last competition, Marvin was paired with a skilled participant from another club. His rival threw him to the mats, and as Marvin struggled, came down hard to pin him down. Marvin heard a snap, followed by instant pain in his left forearm. Radiographs at the local hospital confirmed that he suffered a transverse fracture of the distal aspect of his left ulna.

1. What are the typical signs and symptoms of a fracture? Why shortly after the injury does the pain temporarily subside?

2. How does a hematoma form, and what function does it serve in the process of healing a fracture?

3. Marvin was told he would be seeing a physiotherapist as his healing progressed. What are the muscular and joint changes that occur during immobilization and the ways Marvin, and his physiotherapist can work to address these changes?

Follow this Example.

Case Study, Chapter 4, Genetic Control of Cell Function and Inheritance Marsha and Clement are both carriers of sickle cell anemia, a disease that is autosomal recessive. Their first child, Amelia, does not have the disease. Marsha and Clement are planning another pregnancy, but they are concerned about their second child having the condition. Clement’s father died from complications of sickle cell disease shortly before Amelia was born

1. What is the likelihood of Marsha and Clement having a baby with sickle cell anemia? What is the chance the baby will be a carrier of the disease, just like the parents?

The gene is recessive, so the parents will have a 25% chance of giving birth to a child with the disease. There is a 50% chance that the baby will be a carrier

2. Marsha suggested to the nurse at the local family planning clinic that if the baby were a boy, he might have a higher risk of developing the disease, just like his grandfather. How would you respond?

The disease is autosomal in nature, meaning the disease arises from an abnormality on chromosomes 1 to 22. These chromosomes are alike in both males and females.

3. When Amelia, who does not have sickle cell anemia, grows up and marries someone who does have the disease, how likely will her children have the disease?

If Amelia has children to a father with sickle cell disease, the children will be carriers only.

Scroll to Top